Interesting day in the woods and a few things to think about.

Discussion in 'Crossbow Hunting - Deer' started by jacol84, Feb 15, 2017.

  1. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    I had assignments the last two days, so when there was nothing I wanted today, I decided to get up to the mountain and bring out my tree stands before the family started logging. As far as the good went, I did see the most sign (tracks and poop) close to the two places I had stands. At the upper stand I did some scouting farther up a grassy road and found the area above a 6 yr. old clearcut to look very good. Definitely the kind of place you'd like to sit in rifle season. I did look over and saw a tripod stand to the East of me, so someone else thought the same thing.;) Went back, collected the little stand (like the weight, but not the cramped platform) and took it and the ladder down the hill. Easy peasy. Took that to the van, and went after the big stand. The big stand is 30" long and close to 2' wide. Nice to sit in, but heavy. Went up, sat on the top of my 15' ladder like I always do, and got the strap loose and carefully let the stand fall to the ground. That's when things got interesting. I got my left leg free of the top of the ladder, but my right was still kind of stuck in there. I usually put both arms around the tree and free the other leg, then climb down. I really didn't feel confident in trying that now. My left arm/shoulder even after over a year of trying to build strength in it, was just not giving me the idea I could do that move. The tree (Poplar) was too big for me to really get a hold of. I tried to stay calm and figure it out. I finally decided that my best move was to grab the top of the ladder where it braced against the tree as hard as I could with my right hand. I'm here typing this, so of course, that worked.:D I spent a few minutes looking around to see where I might put a ladder stand instead of the hang on and stick ladder.;) I realized that I had been relying on grabbing the stand itself to get in position to descend the ladder for over a year now. Without the stand there,:eek:. My days of hang ons may be coming to an end.:( I will have to figure the place out once the logging is completed.
     
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  2. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    Glad you made it out without any injuries. Once the logging is done things will change a little but deer will stick to the same trails they've used for a long, they are creatures of habit, they like the same bedding areas they've always use.
    My dr has banned me from ladders, wife has banned me from the trees, now I'm a ground hunter :), adapt and overcome an keep on hunting :D
     
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  3. Masboy

    Masboy Active Member

    Like said glad your ok! I love latters an feel safe using them but always try to get help putting them up when I can or taking them down. But don,t always happen :rolleyes: nothing better to get the blood pumping than the old latter ride to the ground:eek:
     
  4. Joe

    Joe Active Member

    Just wondering have you men ever thought about using climbers ; I started about 3/4 years back when introduced to them by " Big John " member from another x-bow sight tell you with a little common sense and some caution I would not change this hunting style wish I had started using climbers years ago .

    Glad the shoulder is healing for you Jeff keep up the good work :)

    Joe :)
     
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  5. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    Thanks, guys. Joe, the last time I used a climber, it was an old Loggy Bayou, and but the time I was in the positionI wanted to be in, I made so much noise and sweated so much, I knew I wasn't going to see anything. The stick ladder and hang on has worked well for me since I have used tree stands. This ladder that caused my excitement today, I used for over a season with no issues before today. Just thinking about how I want to go about staying in the game.
     
    Joe likes this.
  6. Joe

    Joe Active Member

    Hay Jeff next time you are in Cabellas have a look at the " Summits "you may change your opinion re-guarding climbers i`m 6` 4`` 260 # an feel quite safe and comfortable .

    Joe :)
     
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  7. City Rat

    City Rat Member

    X2 I just got a summit 180 ** Max. The animals shift patterns hard where I hunt as the season goes on. My great tree stand is only good for about three weeks now until pressure breaks up the herd, and they spread out and go nocturnal. I really like that I will be able to just pick up and move with the game without any fuss.
     
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  8. xcaliber

    xcaliber Active Member

    Joe, I too love the climbers. It stinks carrying them boogers, but you learn to dress lightly walking in to avoid getting sweaty, and you pack a light lunch, and carry only the chit you need. But I feel safe going up 25' or more, and down. I keep my dragging, and dressing stuff at the truck, and when i make a kill, I go unload, lock it up, and go back for my deer. I even dress in different jacket, etc for the dirty work.
     
  9. xcaliber

    xcaliber Active Member

    The trick is to get a good self leveling stand, and scout for deer, and trim the trees late winter, early spring. I have found my best spots after the season has ended in most cases. Yes, finding a tree to climb in an area that is hot at certain times can be real hard. I do use a ground blind, or nothing but a small chair at times when i find a lot of sign in an area that offers no climbing trees. I rarely hunt the same spot more than 3 times a season.
     
  10. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    I found around here after they logged the woods the bucks like to lay near the edges just inside the woods, they can see everything and still make a quick get away. Mornings before they get in there are better than afternoons when they are already in there. Of coarse now the raspberry bushes are over my head so no way am I getting in there anyway.
     
  11. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    I'll just have to see what the place looks like when the logging is done. The one place that looked good is actual SGL just off the family's property, so that won't change. I will likely get in there after the logging and make up some brush blinds to do most of my hunting. I do enjoy not having the put on the harness and all the other stuff. I won't miss climbing up in the tree pre dawn, trying to be quiet and haul the CB up there, but elevation does have its advantages. I prefer hunting mornings, but my night vision is getting bad, so finding my hunting place in the dark has become an adventure. I seem to be going back too quickly.:(I've killed 2 of my 3 biggest bucks on this property in the last 5 years. They aren't really big by most people's standards, but fine with me. Certainly worth any time spent trying to figure things out.
     
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  12. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    It's the memories that make the trophy, not the size of the horns.
    Every logging operation is different, some leave a mess behind, most respect the land and do a good job. One operation just over the hill from me is doing a fantastic job, they are even cutting up the tree tops left behind into smaller piles so the woods aren't impassable when they leave. Deer love to nibble on the tips of the branches this time of the year so they are attracted to logging areas. They have food and cover all in one spot an are almost impossible to see in there.
     
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  13. med1pilot

    med1pilot Member

    Glad that worked this time. In my line of work, we take in hunters who fall from tree stands every year. Many of them don't do well, some never walk again, and some don't survive. Here's my sixty seconds of preaching: Full body safety harness, prussic-loop safety line (http://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/whitetail-365/2010/07/video-make-your-own-treestand-safety-line), well made tree stands, and someone who knows where you will be and when to expect you back. End of sermon.
    I'll be back bow hunting this coming season for the first time in over fifteen years (waiting for my first crossbow, the Katana 360 I ordered to arrive :D ), and it will take me awhile to get comfortable amongst the trees again. I might even take a shot at a ground blind this year. I'm really really looking forward to getting within arrow range of a white tail again after all these years. :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2017
  14. bbahunter

    bbahunter Active Member

    Great post Med1pilot, congrats on your Katana 360, and good luck this season with it.
     
    jacol84 likes this.
  15. glassman_48

    glassman_48 Member

    Med1pilot,
    Nice post, I was REALLY lucky when I first started hunting a couple that I trusted a lot looked me right in the eye and said whatever you do if your in a tree blind, make sure you tie yourself in somehow. I just took a stout rope and wrapped it around me and the tree. Next thing I know I was hanging out by the end of the rope and almost dropped my compound bow. I was 25' high up in a tree. I never go up in a tree again without making sure I am tied in good.
     
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  16. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    Good post and thanks for the reminder, Med1pilot. I learned in a few seconds that I have been "getting away" with some stuff for a while, and at my age and now physical challenges, I simply can't do that anymore. There's a good chance I'll just be staying on the ground from now on. Getting a deer is getting less important to me these days anyway.:(
     
  17. med1pilot

    med1pilot Member

    Had a friend who fell about twenty feet. He was at the top of his ladder and just reached for a branch to turn into his sitting position. The branch snapped and he went out backwards. Broke his neck among other injuries. He was one of the lucky ones. A couple weeks in the CCU, then he had to wear a halo screwed into his head with his body brace for quite awhile afterwards. Not fun.
     
  18. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    A couple yrs ago I was tracking a buck in the dark and tripped on a branch, first thing to hit the ground was my forehead, rattled my brain pretty good and left a nice mark. Got my butt chewed hard over that episode :eek:. Half a dozen trips to my pretty little chiropractor and I was good as new, well as good as I get anyway :D

    I did find my buck the next morning, thirty yards from where I crashed but the critters found him first an had a real good meal :(.
     

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