Mr. Murphy couldn't prevent me from having a good morning.

Discussion in 'Crossbow Hunting - Deer' started by jacol84, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    Where buck was.jpg

    This was my one chance I could hunt this week, so I went for it. When I got to the farm, I saw no deer driving in the lane. Sometimes see a dozen or more. Up the road 30 yds. into the woods, turn to park the Mountaineer, and there's a deer bounding away, and another crossing the headlights before I could turn them off. Head up the road to the T and I can hear deer on both sides of the road, most bounding/running, a snort of two. When I got to the T, I went left and after 40 yards or so, assuming I was above the deer, I cocked the crossbow. More bounding and a few snorts, but all below me.:) Just another reason I won't cock the crossbow right at a stand, especially on a calm morning.;) Headed up the main trail/road up to the flat where my son killed his first archery buck, and where we have seen several bucks in mid-early season. It was never easy as an old logging road, now a renewed logging road, it was rocky and strewn with forearm sized branches. Thankful for all the leg strengthening I've forced myself to do this year. Got close to where the side trail used to break off, but it looks different with all the logging activity. I look to my left and see a decent opening, with a log to sit on perhaps 20 yards from the road I'm on. Decided to sit there until it was light enough to really see. I figured this was more of a scouting trip than a real deer hunt anyway since I had no stand that I could use today. Weather station said NNE wind (there was hardly any wind), and I was really feeling the humidity when I got to the log and got ready to wait. Sitting facing the road, brush screening me from below until the deer got in an opening I could shoot. Naturally, I hear deer coming up the mountain behind me!:rolleyes: Still not really light. Can't turn around. Suddenly there is a leaf crunch that sounds pretty close. Then a few bounds, then the second deer bounds a few times too. Thought "they know I'm here, but that's not too bad. Then the snort, but it was only one.:) They finally moved up the hill. I put my leafy mask and hood on now, and I had pretty much stopped sweating.:rolleyes: I heard a faint sound behind and below me, so I carefully turned and knelt beside the log to face away from the road. Another, louder deer/leaf noise. Then he moved into the opening you see in the pic above. It was right at legal shooting time, but I couldn't see well. Knew it was a buck, as he looked at me, but only for a second and he went back to just doing deer stuff. Couldn't tell how big the rack was, just that he had one.:) He took a few steps forward and stopped with his head behind the tree with the red paint on it. Twenty five broadside standing with his head behind the tree. I never seriously considered putting the bow up to look through the scope. I didn't know for sure how big the rack was, just that it wasn't anything special. When he moved off a little, I could see the rack against a light rock in the background. Looked like a decent 6 point, but nothing more. Had another quartering away chance. He's still doing his thing, and I'm typing on the 'puter instead of sweating my butt off.;) I waited a couple of hours to finally go on my scouting mission.:) A lot of deer tracks on the road above where I was sitting, the majority of which were heading downhill.:eek: I looked around some for an ambush spot and there were a few choices. I found the side trail I always used to be able to find in the dark.:rolleyes: Went out there about 100 yards, and it got to be a chore avoiding the deer droppings as I walked.;) Found the place in the second pic, and I think I will try an afternoon/evening hunt there, as soon as conditions are right. The trail coming down the mountain at the far left of the pic is right where my son's deer was lying when he took me to it.:D The deer are definitely getting up the hill farther and earlier than the last 3 years. Gypsy moths under control and more rain has the oaks dropping acorns again. Gotta adapt. For today, like Frank says, having fun in the woods without all the work.:D

    afternoon:evening spot?.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2017
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  2. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    Yes indeed, adapt and overcome :). With all that deer sign it's only a matter of when you'll fill your tags. Love the pictures.
    Watch those darn tripper's on the paths they have a way of putting us on the ground all banged up an moaning :eek:.
     
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  3. Jack Pine

    Jack Pine Active Member

    Lots of time left yet Jeff. Been out 3 times and haven't seen a thing, but that will change when they have to move to keep warm and eat more.
     
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  4. Masboy

    Masboy Active Member

    Sounds like a exciting hunt with deer everywhere! looks like the place to be . any pawpaws up there as there,s a bumper crop here this year in the river hills .
    good luck
     
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  5. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    Not sure about pawpaws, Frank. There are quite a few tree stumps, tree tops, and a few big piles of logs around though.;)
     
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  6. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    I just hope you don't get the briars we got here after the logger's left. They offered to spray the woods with a round-up type of weed killer for the low low price of $1, 000 a acre andand sprayed from the skidders. You can't even walk through there now. The other woods we hunt had a much different crew, they used a feller buncher an cut up & chipped the tops, two totally different results, those woods are pretty clear yet with a lot of big trees left.
     
  7. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    Bruce, the state clear cut a section of the game lands next to this property in 2010. If you want to go through there, you have to crawl, and it would be good to have some "briar proof" small game clothing on. Good bedding area for the deer for a while. Trails show they work around it more than go through it. This property was more selective cut. Remains to be seen what it develops into, but I don't think it will be horrible.
     
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  8. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    Makes for fantastic bedding area's for deer as long as you don't need to go in and drag them back out it. Generally deer love newly logged areas, they can have everything they want in one spot so my strategy is to intercept them when they're come out there. They love to hide in all the tree tops left behind and Pop-up like Bunny's , run an give you the White Tail :p :). Some times they stop and look back :), big mistake :D.
     
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  9. bbahunter

    bbahunter Active Member

    Jeff, sounds like you had a nice and successful morning regardless. ;)
    Sounds like you found a nice spot with acorns, that spot will probably produce a deer for you right now.
    We had alot of acorns last year, but spotty this year.
    The hunting weather here has been crappy, alot of warm and humid days, 2 days ago it was so humid it was disgusting. i have only hunted 3 times in my new spot in CT. with only seeing a couple does.
    Mass opens monday for me.:)
    Good luck to you.
     
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  10. xcaliber

    xcaliber Active Member

    Good luck! A good spot is just what it takes most times.
     
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  11. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    By the way Jeff, I like those stones in your first picture, they are sure pretty to a stone guy like me. I'm always moving them somewhere.
     
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  12. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    Thanks, guys. Good luck to you all. I know for me, seeing deer and getting in position for a good shot are two very different things. I have had to adapt year to year in this place. Sometimes a pattern holds for a few years, then something happens and I have to figure it out all over again. Not sure I'm going to put up a tree stand, might be all ground hunting. Now that they are finished logging, I really want to get up there a lot this winter and build a bunch of brush blinds for next year. This year's gonna be a crap shoot.

    Brian, I very much want to see a pic of Crab Claw with your compound bow sitting on him.

    Bruce, that's white "sandstone". Forms the ridges of the Appalachians. This being the Blue Mountain, it is composed of the coarsest sediments, but it's almost all quartz, so it really doesn't weather very much.
     
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  13. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    I have a thing with "old stone". Here in the Endless mountains it's mostly sedimentary rocks an shale but we also have big stones the size of cars.

    Same here, go get him!
     
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  14. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    How are the Ash trees in those woods? Their going down fast around here.
     
  15. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    Emerald Ash borer has decimated the Ash trees. They cut most of them down while they were still worth something.

    We have rocks like you describe to our south. Igneous rocks (Diabase). The rocks in the Appalachians have been squeezed a bit compared to the plateau of northern PA. Some pockets of metamorphic rocks like slate, gneiss, and quartzite. The whole story is pretty crazy.
     
  16. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    I have lost a lot of the trees more everytime the wind blows. PGC has declared the Ash Trees extinct in Pa already.

    I love that story though.
     
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  17. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    Yep, sad for the Ash trees. Used to love cutting and splitting that and black locust for firewood (chain saw teeth didn't like the locust so much).;)

    Bruce, at least the bedrock you stand on is made of sediment that came from North America.:D
     
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  18. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member

    Yes sir! There are two Blue Stone quarry's less than a mile from me, one is closed, back filled, then put a Natural gas pad on it. There's a nice Ladder stand right at the corner of the well pad and the gas line right away, talk about adapting.
     
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  19. jacol84

    jacol84 Active Member

    Out this AM and nothing in the place I started at dawn. Waited till around 9 to come out of the woods. Medium height trail compared to others, and heard some deer go out above me. Decided I'd go over and check the place I went the first day, and when I'm almost there, a doe jumps up from a downed tee top. 20 yards, but kinda small. See a brown flash and heard a snort about 100 yds down the hill.:confused: Brown flash was the small doe's fawn. Doe must have been a year and a half old. Went down to check my tree from last year, as there was always a scrape 5 yds away from it. Nothing. Was about to keep walking the 200 yds back to the truck, when I saw movement below. Big doe, solo. She was moving east to west into the wind, and looked to be angling up the hill. Saw a lot of deer go up the hill between this logging road and the main dirt road in the woods, so I went up the road as quietly as possible, got on a new logging road that crosses both, and set up to wait. She must have stayed low and kept moving west. Last time they were too far up the hill too early for me. Now the big doe is about 100 yds from the field at 9;30 in the morning.:eek::confused: I'll figure this out, or I won't.;)
     
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  20. Oppie

    Oppie Active Member


    Your way ahead of a lot of guys by just getting out there and seeing deer. Spooked deer try to move with the wind a little ways the try to circle back into the wind. Sometimes they like to find out what spooked them if they aren't pursued and come back for a look.

    "Deer don't always trust their eye's an ears but always trust what their Nose knows :D"
     
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